Joan Fitzalan

F, b. 1347, d. 7 April 1419
Father*Richard Fitzalan b. 1313, d. 24 Jan 1376
Mother*Eleanor Plantagenet b. 1318, d. 1372
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Name1359As of 1359,her married name was De Bohun.
     Lady Joan Fitzalan, Countess of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton (1347/1348- 7 April 1419), was the wife of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford, 6th Earl of Essex, and 2nd Earl of Northampton. Joan was the mother of Mary de Bohun, the first wife of Henry of Bolingbroke who later reigned as King Henry IV of England, and Eleanor de Bohun, Duchess of Gloucester. She was the maternal grandmother of King Henry V of England.

Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster, parents of Lady Joan FitzalanIn 1400, she gave the order for the beheading of John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter in revenge for the part he had played in the execution of her brother, Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel.

Lady Joan was born in about 1347 or 1348 at Arundel Castle, Sussex, one of seven children, and the eldest daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster.[1] Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne. Her maternal grandparents were Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

Sometime after 9 September 1359, Joan married Humphrey de Bohun, one of the most powerful noblemen in the realm. His titles included 7th Earl of Hereford, 6th Earl of Essex, 2nd Earl of Northampton, and he was the hereditary Constable of England. He was the son of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. Their marriage united two of the most prominent noble families in the kingdom; an alliance which was further strengthened by her elder brother Richard's marriage to Humphrey's sister, Elizabeth.

Together Humphrey and Joan produced two daughters, whom upon the death of their father, divided his vast estates between them:

- Eleanor de Bohun (c.1360- 3 October 1399), co-heiress of her father. In 1376 she married Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, the youngest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. The marriage produced five children, including Anne of Gloucester. Eleanor died as a nun at Barking Abbey.
- Mary de Bohun (1369- 4 June 1394), co-heiress of her father. On 27 July 1380 she married Henry of Bolingbroke, who would later be crowned King Henry IV. She died before he ascended the throne. The marriage produced six children including King Henry V of England.

Children of Joan Fitzalan and Humphrey De Bohun

Henry Plantagenet

M, b. circa 1281, d. 22 September 1345
Father*Edmund Crouchback of England b. 1245, d. 1296
Mother*Blanche D Artois b. 1248, d. 2 May 1302
     Earl of Leicester (1324), succeeded as Earl of Lancaster by 1326.

Children of Henry Plantagenet and Maud Chaworth

Maud Chaworth

F, b. 1282, d. before December 1322
Father*Patrick de Chaworth d. 7 Jul 1283
Mother*Isabella de Beauchamp d. 1306
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationMaud Chaworth was also known as de Chaorces.
Name VariationMaud Chaworth was also known as de Chaworth.
Married Namebefore 2 March 1297As of before 2 March 1297,her married name was Plantagenet.

Children of Maud Chaworth and Henry Plantagenet

Eleanor de Clare

F, b. 1292, d. 30 June 1337
Father*Gilbert De Clare b. 2 Sep 1243, d. 7 Dec 1295
Mother*Joan of Acre b. Apr 1272, d. 23 Apr 1307
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was le Despenser.
     Eleanor de Clare (3 October 1292 – June 30, 1337) was the wife of the powerful Hugh Despenser the younger. She was born in 1292 at Caerphilly in Glamorgan, Wales. She was the eldest daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford and 7th Earl of Gloucester, and Joan of Acre, daughter of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile; thus she was a granddaughter to Edward I of England. With her sisters, Elizabeth de Clare and Margaret de Clare, she inherited her father's estates after the death of her brother, Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Gloucester at Bannockburn in 1314.1

Children of Eleanor de Clare and Hugh the Younger le Despenser

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_de_Clare

Hugh the Younger le Despenser

M, b. 1286, d. 24 November 1326
Father*Hugh the Elder le Despenser b. 1262, d. 27 Oct 1326
Mother*Isabella de Beauchamp d. 1306
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationHugh the Younger le Despenser was also known as Despenser.
     1st Lord Despenser. Hugh Despenser, 1st Lord Despenser (1286 – 24 November 1326, sometimes referred to as "the younger Despenser", was the son and heir of Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester, by Isabella de Beauchamp, daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

He was knight of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, King's Chamberlain, Constable of Odiham Castle, Keeper of the castle and town of Portchester, Keeper of the castle, town and barton of Bristol and, in Wales, Keeper of the castle and town of Dryslwyn, and the region of Cantref Mawr, Carmarthenshire. Also in Wales, he was Lord of Glamorgan which gave him possession of Cardiff Castle. He was also Keeper of the castles, manor, and lands of Brecknock, Hay, Cantref Selyf, etc., in County Brecon, and, in England of Huntington, Herefordshire. He was given Wallingford Castle although this had previously been given to Queen Isabella for life.

In May 1306 Hugh was knighted, and that summer he married Eleanor de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 9th Lord of Clare and 7th Earl of Hertford and Joan of Acre. Eleanor's grandfather, Edward I, owed Hugh's father vast sums of money, and the marriage was intended as a payment of these debts. When Eleanor's brother was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn, she unexpectedly became one of the three co-heiresses to the rich Gloucester earldom, and in her right Hugh inherited Glamorgan and other properties. In just a few short years Hugh went from a landless knight to one of the wealthiest magnates in the kingdom.

Eleanor was also the niece of the new king, Edward II of England, and this connection brought Hugh closer to the English royal court. He joined the baronial opposition to Piers Gaveston, the king's favourite, and Hugh's brother-in-law, as Gaveston was married to Eleanor's sister. Eager for power and wealth, Hugh seized Tonbridge Castle in 1315. In 1318 he murdered Llywelyn Bren, a Welsh hostage in his custody.

Eleanor and Hugh had nine children.1

Children of Hugh the Younger le Despenser and Eleanor de Clare

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_le_Despenser_the_Younger

Humphrey De Bohun

M, b. 1276, d. circa 1322
Father*Humphrey VI De Bohun b. c 1249, d. 31 Dec 1298
Mother*Maud de Fiennes
     4th Earl of Hereford and 3rd Earl of Essex. Humphrey VIII de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (1276 – 16 March 1322) was a member of a powerful Anglo-Norman family of the Welsh Marches and was one of the Ordainers who opposed Edward II's excesses.1

Children of Humphrey De Bohun and Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphrey_de_Bohun,_4th_Earl_of_Hereford.

Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan

F, b. 7 August 1282, d. 5 May 1316
Father*King Edward I of England b. 17 Jun 1239, d. 7 Jul 1307
Mother*Eleanor of Castile d. 28 Nov 1290
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationPrincess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan was also known as of England.
Married Name14 November 1302As of 14 November 1302,her married name was De Bohun.
     Elizabeth of Rhuddlan (also Elizabeth Plantagenet; 7 August 1282 – 5 May 1316) was the eighth daughter of Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile. Of all of her siblings, she was closest to her younger brother Edward II of England, as they were only two years apart in age.

In April 1285 there were negotiations with Floris V for Elizabeth's betrothal to his son John I, Count of Holland. The offer was accepted and John was sent to England to be educated. On 8 January 1297 Elizabeth was married to John at Ipswich. In attendance at the marriage were Elizabeth's sister Margaret, her father, Edward I of England, her brother Edward, and Humphrey de Bohun. After the wedding Elizabeth was expected to go to Holland with her husband, but did not wish to go, leaving her husband to go alone.

After some time traveling England, it was decided Elizabeth should follow her husband. Her father accompanied her, traveling through the Southern Netherlands between Antwerp, Mechelen, Leuven and Brussels, before ending up in Ghent. There they remained for a few months, spending Christmas with her two sisters Eleanor of England, Countess of Bar and Margaret Plantagenet. On 10 November 1299, John died of dysentery, though there were rumours of his murder. No children had been born from the marriage.

On her return trip to England, Elizabeth went through Brabant to see her sister Margaret. When she arrived in England, she met her stepmother Margaret of France, whom Edward had married whilst she was in Holland. Reportedly, they became inseparable. On 14 November 1302 Elizabeth was married to Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, 3rd of Essex, also Constable of England, at Westminster Abbey.

During Christmas 1315, Elizabeth, who was pregnant with her eleventh child, was visited by her sister-in-law Isabella of France. This was a great honour, but the stress of it may have caused unknown health problems that later contributed to Elizabeth's death in childbirth. On 5 May 1316 she went into labour, giving birth to her daughter Isabella. Both Elizabeth and her daughter Isabella died shortly after the birthing, and were buried together in Waltham Abbey.1

Children of Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan and Humphrey De Bohun

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_of_Rhuddlan

King Edward I of England

M, b. 17 June 1239, d. 7 July 1307
Father*King Henry III of England b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
Mother*Eleanor of Provence b. c 1223, d. Jun 1291
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationKing Edward I of England was also known as Plantagenet.
Name VariationKing Edward I of England was also known as Edward Longshanks.
     Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks, was King of England from 1272 to 1307. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English Barons. In 1259 he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford. After reconciliation with his father, however, he remained loyal throughout the subsequent armed conflict, known as the Barons' War. After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and joined the fight against Simon de Montfort. Montfort was defeated at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, and within two years the rebellion was extinguished. With England pacified, Edward left on crusade to the Holy Land. The crusade accomplished little, and Edward was on his way home in 1272 when he was informed that his father had died. Making a slow return, he reached England in 1274 and he was crowned king at Westminster on 19 August.

Edward's reign had two main phases. He spent the first years reforming royal administration. Through an extensive legal inquiry Edward investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. After suppressing a minor rebellion in Wales in 1276–77, Edward responded to a second rebellion in 1282–83 with a full-scale war of conquest. After a successful campaign, Edward subjected Wales to English rule, built a series of castles and towns in the countryside and settled them with Englishmen. Next, his efforts were directed towards Scotland. Initially invited to arbitrate a succession dispute, Edward claimed feudal suzerainty over the kingdom. In the war that followed, the Scots persevered, even though the English seemed victorious at several points. At the same time there were problems at home. In the mid-1290s, extensive military campaigns led to unbearable levels of taxation, and Edward met with both lay and ecclesiastical opposition. These crises were initially averted, but issues remained unsettled. When the king died in 1307, he left behind a number of financial and political problems to his son Edward II, as well as an ongoing war with Scotland.

Edward I was a tall man for his age, hence the nickname "Longshanks". He was also temperamental and this, along with his height, made him an intimidating man and he often instilled fear in his contemporaries. Nevertheless, he held the respect of his subjects for the way in which he embodied the medieval ideal of kingship, both as a soldier, administrator and a man of faith. Modern historians have been more divided on their assessment of the king; while some have praised him for his contribution to the law and administration, others have criticised him for his uncompromising attitude to his nobility. Currently, Edward I is credited with many accomplishments during his reign, including restoring royal authority after the reign of Henry III, establishing parliament as a permanent institution and thereby also a functional system for raising taxes, and reforming the law through statutes. At the same time, he is also often criticised for other actions, such as his brutal conduct towards the Scots, and the expulsion of the Jews from England in 1290.1

Children of King Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile

Child of King Edward I of England and Margaret of France

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_I_of_England

Juliana FitzGerald

F, b. circa 1263, d. 24 September 1300
Father*Maurice FitzGerald b. c 1238
Mother*Maud de Prendergast b. 17 Mar 1242, d. b 1273
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationJuliana FitzGerald was also known as Juiane Fitz Maurice.
Name VariationJuliana FitzGerald was also known as FitzMaurice.
Married NameFebruary 1275As of February 1275,her married name was De Clare.
     Her numerous descendants included English kings Henry V, Edward IV, Richard III, Mary, Queen of Scots, Anne Boleyn, Mary Boleyn, and Diana, Princess of Wales. The current British Royal Family directly descend from her, as do most of the other European royal families. Lady of Thomond.

Child of Juliana FitzGerald and Thomas De Clare

Maurice FitzGerald

M, b. circa 1238
     3rd Lord of Offaly.

Child of Maurice FitzGerald and Maud de Prendergast

Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk

F, b. 1366, d. 8 July 1425
Father*Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel b. c 1346, d. 1397
Mother*Lady Elizabeth De Bohun b. c 1350, d. 3 Apr 1385
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Namebefore December 1378As of before December 1378,her married name was de Montagu.
Married NameJuly 1384As of July 1384,her married name was de Mowbray.
Married NameJuly 1384As of July 1384,her married name was Mowbray.
Married Namecirca 1400As of circa 1400,her married name was Goushill.
Married Namecirca 1400As of circa 1400,her married name was Gousell.
Married Namebefore April 1411As of before April 1411,her married name was Usflete.
     Elizabeth had four husbands and at least six children. Through her daughters Joan and Elizabeth Goushill, Elizabeth Fitzalan is an ancestor of Sir Winston Churchill and U.S. Presidents James Madison, Zachary Taylor, George W. Bush and Franklin D. Roosevelt, among others, while Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth I, Lady Jane Grey, Sarah Ferguson and Audrey Hepburn can be counted with the descendants of her daughters Margaret and Isabel Mowbray.

Children of Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk and Thomas de Mowbray

Children of Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk and Robert Goushill

Robert Goushill

M, d. 21 July 1403
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationRobert Goushill was also known as Gousell.

Children of Robert Goushill and Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk

Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel

M, b. circa 1346, d. 1397
Father*Richard Fitzalan b. 1313, d. 24 Jan 1376
Mother*Eleanor Plantagenet b. 1318, d. 1372
     Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and 10th Earl of Surrey (1346 – 21 September 1397) was an English medieval nobleman and military commander.

He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster and was born in 1346.[1] He succeeded his father on 24 January 1376.

His brother was Thomas Arundel who was Bishop of Ely from 1374 to 1388, then Archbishop of York from 1388 to 1397, then Archbishop of Canterbury.[2]

At the coronation of Richard II, Richard FitzAlan carried the crown.[1]1 11th or 4th Earl of Arundel and 10th Earl of Surrey.

Children of Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel and Lady Elizabeth De Bohun

Child of Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel and Lady Philippa de Mortimer

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Fitzalan,_11th_Earl_of_Arundel.

Lady Elizabeth De Bohun

F, b. circa 1350, d. 3 April 1385
Father*William De Bohun b. c 1312, d. 1360
Mother*Elizabeth De Badlesmere b. 1313, d. 8 Jun 1356
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Name28 September 1359As of 28 September 1359,her married name was Fitzalan.
     Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey (c.1350- 3 April 1385), was a member of the Anglo-Norman Bohun family, which wielded much power in the Welsh Marches and the English government. She was the first wife of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel, Earl of Surrey, (1346- 21 September 1397 Tower Hill, Cheapside, London), a powerful English nobleman and military commander in the reigns of Edward III and Richard II. She was the mother of seven of his children, and as the wife of one of the most powerful nobles in the realm enjoyed much prestige and took precedence over most of the other peers' wives.

Lady Elizabeth de Bohun was born around 1350, the daughter of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. Her older brother Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford married Joan Fitzalan, a sister of the 11th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had two daughters. Elizabeth had a half-brother Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March by her mother's first marriage to Sir Edmund Mortimer.

Her paternal grandparents were Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, daughter of King Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile. Her maternal grandparents were Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare.

Lady Elizabeth's parents both died when she was young, her mother having died in 1356, and her father in 1360.

Arundel Castle, principal residence of Richard Fitzalan and Elizabeth de Bohun[edit] Marriage and children
On 28 September 1359, by Papal dispensation,[1] Elizabeth married Richard Fitzalan, who succeeded to the earldoms of Arundel and Surrey upon the death of his father, Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel in 1376. Their marriage was especially advantageous as it united two of the most powerful families in England. The alliance was further strengthened by the marriage of Elizabeth's brother, Humphrey to Fitzalan's sister Joan.

As the Countess of Arundel, Elizabeth was one of the most important women in England, who enjoyed much prestige, and after the Queen, the Duchesses of Lancaster and York, and the Countess of Buckingham, took precedence over the other noble ladies in the realm.1

Children of Lady Elizabeth De Bohun and Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_de_Bohun

Thomas Fitzalan

M, b. 1381, d. 1415
Father*Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel b. c 1346, d. 1397
Mother*Lady Elizabeth De Bohun b. c 1350, d. 3 Apr 1385
     7th Earl of Arundel.

William de Montagu IV

M, d. 1383
Father*William Montacute b. 25 Jun 1328, d. 3 Jun 1397
Mother*Elizabeth de Mohun
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationWilliam de Montagu IV was also known as William Montacute.

Thomas de Mowbray

M, b. 1366, d. 22 September 1399
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationThomas de Mowbray was also known as Mowbray.
     1st Duke of Norfolk.

Children of Thomas de Mowbray and Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk

Gerard Usflete

M

Mary De Bohun

F, b. circa 1368, d. 4 June 1394
Father*Humphrey De Bohun b. 1342, d. 1373
Mother*Joan Fitzalan b. 1347, d. 7 Apr 1419
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Name1381As of 1381,her married name was of Bolingbroke.
     Mary de Bohun was the first wife of King Henry IV of England and the mother of King Henry V, but was never queen, as she died before her husband came to the throne.

Child of Mary De Bohun and King Henry IV of Bolingbroke

King Henry IV of Bolingbroke

M, b. 3 April 1366, d. 20 March 1413
Father*John of Gaunt b. 6 Mar 1340, d. 3 Feb 1399
Mother*Blanche of Lancaster b. 25 Mar 1345, d. 12 Sep 1369
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationKing Henry IV of Bolingbroke was also known as King Henry IV of England.

Child of King Henry IV of Bolingbroke and Mary De Bohun

King Henry V of Bolingbroke

M, b. 1386, d. 31 August 1422
Father*King Henry IV of Bolingbroke b. 3 Apr 1366, d. 20 Mar 1413
Mother*Mary De Bohun b. c 1368, d. 4 Jun 1394
     Henry V was King of England from 1413 until his death. From an unassuming start, his military successes in the Hundred Years' War, culminating with his famous victory at the Battle of Agincourt, saw him come close to uniting the realms of England and France under his rule.

John de Beaumont

M, d. May 1342
Father*Henry de Beaumont b. c 1288, d. 1340
Mother*Alice Comyn b. 1289, d. 3 Jul 1349
     2nd Lord Beaumont, Earl of Buchan.

Children of John de Beaumont and Eleanor Plantagenet

Edmund de Mortimer

M, b. 1310, d. 16 December 1331
Father*Roger de Mortimer b. 25 Apr 1287, d. 29 Nov 1330
Mother*Joan de Geneville b. 1286, d. 1356
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationEdmund de Mortimer was also known as Mortimer.
     Lord Mortimer of Wigmore.

Children of Edmund de Mortimer and Elizabeth De Badlesmere

Gilbert de Unfreville

M, d. before 1307

Richard Fitzalan

M, b. 1266, d. 9 March 1302
Father*John Fitzalan b. 14 Sep 1246, d. 18 Mar 1272
Mother*Isabella Mortimer b. a 1247, d. 1292
     Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel (7th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) (February 3 1266/7 – March 9 1301/2) was an English Norman medieval nobleman.

He was the son of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel (6th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) and Isabella Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore and Maud de Braose. His paternal grandparents were John Fitzalan, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud le Botiller.

Richard was feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches. After attaining his majority in 1289 he became the 8th Earl of Arundel, by being summoned to Parliament by a writ directed to the Earl of Arundel.

He was knighted by King Edward I of England in 1289.

He fought in the Welsh wars, 1288 to 1294, when the Welsh castle of Castell y Bere (near modern day Towyn) was besieged by Madog ap Llywelyn. He commanded the force sent to relieve the siege and he also took part in many other campaigns in Wales ; also in Gascony 1295-97; and furthermore in the Scottish wars, 1298-1300.

He married sometime before 1285, Alice of Saluzzo (also known as Alesia di Saluzzo), daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy.1 Earl of Sussex.

Children of Richard Fitzalan and Alasia de Saluzzo

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_FitzAlan,_1st_Earl_of_Arundel.

Joan Fitzalan

F, b. 1375, d. 14 November 1435
Father*Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel b. c 1346, d. 1397
Mother*Lady Elizabeth De Bohun b. c 1350, d. 3 Apr 1385
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Beauchamp.
Married Name23 July 1392As of 23 July 1392,her married name was de Beauchamp.
     Lady Joan FitzAlan, 1st Baroness Bergavenny (1375- 14 November 1435), was an English noblewoman, and the wife of William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny of the Welsh Marches.

Lady Joan FitzAlan was born in 1375, at Arundel Castle, Sussex, England, one of the seven children of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel, Earl of Surrey, and his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun. Her only surviving brother was Thomas Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel, of whom Joan was his co-heiress. She had an older sister Lady Elizabeth FitzAlan who married as her second husband Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk. Her paternal grandparents were Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster. Her maternal grandparents were William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. On 3 April 1385, her mother died. Joan was about ten years old. Her father married secondly, Philippa Mortimer on 15 August 1390, by whom he had a son, John Fitzalan, who was born in 1394.[1] John died sometime after 1397.[2]

On 21 September 1397, Joan's father, the Earl of Arundel, who was also one of the Lords Appellant, was beheaded on Tower Hill, London, on charges of high treason against King Richard II of England. The Earl had always enjoyed much popularity with the citizens of London.[3]His titles and estates were forfeited to the Crown.

In October 1400, the new king Henry IV who had ascended the throne following Richard's deposition in 1399, restored the titles and estates to Thomas Fitzalan, Joan's brother. He became the 12th Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey. Although he married Beatrice, an illegitimate daughter of King John I of Portugal and Inez Perez Esteves, he died childless on 13 October 1415. The Earldom and castle of Arundel passed to a cousin John Fitzalan, 13th Earl of Arundel, the rest of his inheritance was divided among Joan and her two surviving sisters, Elizabeth and Margaret.

On 23 July 1392,[4] Joan was married to William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c.1344- 8 May 1411) the son of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine Mortimer. He was more than thirty years Joan's senior.

The marriage produced a son and a daughter.1

Children of Joan Fitzalan and William de Beauchamp

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Joan_FitzAlan

William de Beauchamp

M, b. 1358, d. 8 May 1411
Father*Thomas de Beauchamp b. 1313, d. 1369
Mother*Catherine de Mortimer b. 1314, d. 4 Aug 1369
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationWilliam de Beauchamp was also known as Beauchamp.
     1st Baron Bergavenny. From "Notes from the Beauchamp-Proctor family in England," it appears that William De Beauchamp, cousin of John, Earl of Pembroke, who died in 1375, held the Manor of Tottenham by virtue of a grant from him, and Ephraim Beauchamp possessed lands in the same Manor which afterwards vested in George Beauchamp Proctor, Esq., of Thetford in Norfolk, by a bequest thereof from his father, Sir William Beauchamp Proctor.

Children of William de Beauchamp and Joan Fitzalan

Alice Fitzalan

F, b. 1378, d. 1415
Father*Richard Fitzalan 11th Earl of Arundel b. c 1346, d. 1397
Mother*Lady Elizabeth De Bohun b. c 1350, d. 3 Apr 1385
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Namebefore March 1391As of before March 1391,her married name was de Cherleton.
     Alice FitzAlan, Lady Cherleton (1378–1415), was an English noblewoman, being the daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel. She was the wife of John Charleton, 4th Baron Cherleton. She was also allegedly the mistress of Cardinal Henry Beaufort, by whom she had an illegitimate daughter, Jane Beaufort,[1] though there is no real evidence to support this.

Lady Alice was born in Arundel Castle, Sussex in 1378, one of the seven children of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel by his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun. She had two brothers, including Thomas Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel, and four sisters, Lady Eleanor FitzAlan, Lady Elizabeth FitzAlan, Lady Joan FitzAlan, and Lady Margaret FitzAlan. Her paternal grandparents were Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster. Her maternal grandparents were William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere.

On 21 September 1397, her father was executed at Tower Hill, Cheapside for high treason against King Richard II of England.

Sometime before March 1392 Alice married John Cherleton, 4th Lord Cherleton (25 April 1362- 19 October 1401).[2] According to popular belief, following her marriage she became the mistress of Cardinal Henry Beaufort, and bore him an illegitimate daughter, Jane Beaufort. In Philip Yorke's The Royal Tribes of Wales, he states that Cardinal Beaufort left an illegitimate daughter by Alice, daughter of Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel.[3] Genealogist Douglas Richardson also confirms the affair between Alice and the Cardinal. Beaufort did indeed father an illegitimate daughter, Jane Beaufort, possibly before Henry took holy orders on 7 April 1397, although the idea of Jane's mother being Alice Fitzalan is possibly a legend of Tudor-era descendants of Jane Beaufort and her husband Sir Edward Stradling. There is no late-14th/early-15th century documentation to support this affair at all, and the surviving documentation entirely discounts it. Jane and Sir Edward Stradling had three sons and a daughter, Katherine.

Alice's husband died on 19 October 1401, and she herself died before October 1415 at the age of about thirty-seven years.1

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_FitzAlan_(1378-1415).

Lady Elizabeth Goushill

F, b. 1396, d. 1491
Father*Robert Goushill d. 21 Jul 1403
Mother*Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk b. 1366, d. 8 Jul 1425
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Wingfield.
Name VariationLady Elizabeth Goushill was also known as Gousell.
     Duchess of Norfolk.

Children of Lady Elizabeth Goushill and Sir Robert Wingfield

Joan Goushill

F, b. after 1400
Father*Robert Goushill d. 21 Jul 1403
Mother*Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess of Norfolk b. 1366, d. 8 Jul 1425
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Stanley.
Name VariationJoan Goushill was also known as Gousell.

Children of Joan Goushill and Thomas Stanley