Humphrey V De Bohun

M, d. 1265
Father*Humphrey IV De Bohun b. c 1208, d. 24 Sep 1275
Mother*Maud de Lusignan b. 1210, d. 14 Aug 1241

Child of Humphrey V De Bohun and Eleanor de Braose

Eleanor de Braose

F, b. circa 1228, d. 1251
Father*William de Braose b. c 1197, d. 2 May 1230
Mother*Eva Marshal b. 1203, d. 1246
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was De Bohun.
     Eleanor de Braose (c.1228- 1251) was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father, who was the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose, Lord Abergavenny, and her mother, Eva Marshal, a granddaughter of Strongbow. Her husband was Humphrey de Bohun, by whom she had three children, including Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford.

Eleanor was born in Brecknock, Breconshire, Wales in about 1228. She was the youngest daughter and co-heiress of the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose, 10th Lord Abergavenny, and Eva Marshal, both of whom held considerable lordships and domains in the Welsh Marches and Ireland. She had three older sisters, Isabella de Braose, Maud de Braose, Baroness Wigmore, and Eve de Braose, wife of William de Cantelou. A manuscript which narrates the descent of the founders of Llanthony Abbey names Isabella, Matildis, Eve et Alianore as the four daughters of Willielmis de Brews quartus and his wife Evam filiam domini Willielmis Mareschalli.[1] The document clearly shows that Eleanor was the youngest of the four girls.

Her paternal grandparents were Reginald de Braose, Lord Abergavenny and Grecia de Briwere. Her maternal grandparents were William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, daughter of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster.

When Eleanor was about two years old, her father - known to the Welsh as Gwilym Ddu (Black William) - was hanged on the orders of Llewelyn the Great, Prince of Wales for alleged adultery with Llewelyn's wife, Joan, Lady of Wales. Following the execution, her mother held de Braose lands and castles in her own right.

On an unknown date after August 1241, at Brecknock, Breconshire, Eleanor married as his first wife,[2] Humphrey de Bohun, the son of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Lusignan. The marriage took place after the death of Humphrey's mother, Maud.

Together Humphrey and Eleanor had three children.1

Child of Eleanor de Braose and Humphrey V De Bohun

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_de_Braose

Reginald de Braose

M, b. circa 1171, d. June 1228
Father*William de Braose b. c 1144, d. 9 Aug 1211
Mother*Matilda de St. Valery b. 1155, d. 1210
     Reginald de Braose (died June 1228) was one of the sons of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and Matilda, also known as Maud de St. Valery and Lady de la Haie. Her other children included William and Giles.[1]

The de Braoses were loyal to King Richard I but grew in power under King John of England. The dynasty was in conflict with King John towards the end of his reign and almost lost everything.

Reginald de Braose was a scion of the powerful Marcher family of de Braose, helped manage its survival and was also related by marriage to the Welsh Princes of Wales.

Contents [hide]
1 Magna Carta Rebel
2 Royal Acquiescence & Welsh Vassal
3 Welsh Conflict
4 Notes
5 References


[edit] Magna Carta Rebel
He supported his brother Giles de Braose in his rebellions against King John. Both brothers were active against the King in the Baron's War. Neither was present at the signing of Magna Carta in June 1215 because at this time they were still rebels who refused to compromise.

[edit] Royal Acquiescence & Welsh Vassal
King John acquiesced to Reginald's claims to the de Braose estates in Wales in May 1216. Reginald became Lord of Brecon, Abergavenny, Builth and held other Marcher Lordships but was also very much a vassal of the Welsh leader Llewelyn Fawr, Prince of Gwynedd who became his father-in-law in 1215 [2]when Reginald married Llywelyn's daughter, Gwladus Ddu, known as Black Gwladys due to her raven hair.

Henry III restored Reginald to favour and the Bramber estates (confiscated by King John) in 1217.

[edit] Welsh Conflict
At this seeming betrayal, Rhys and Owain, Reginald's Welsh nephews who were Princes of Deheubarth, were incensed and they took Builth, except the castle. Llywelyn Fawr also became angry and his forces besieged Brecon. Reginald eventually surrendered to Llewelyn and gave up Seinhenydd (Swansea).

By 1221 they were at war again, with Llewelyn again laying siege to Builth. The siege was relieved by King Henry III's forces. From this time on Llewelyn tended to support the claims of Reginald's nephew John de Braose concerning the de Braose lands in Wales.

Reginald was a witness to the re-issue of Magna Carta by King Henry III in 1225.

He died two or three years later in 1227 or 1228 in Brecon and was succeeded by his son by his first wife, Grecia de Briwere, the ill-fated William de Braose, Lord Abergavenny. He is buried at Brecon Cathedral. His daughter Matilda de Braose was the wife of Rhys Mechyll, Prince of Deheubarth.1

Children of Reginald de Braose and Grecia de Briwere

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_de_Braose

Grecia de Briwere

F, b. 1186, d. 1251
Father*William de Briwere b. c 1145, d. 1226
Mother*Beatrice de Vaux b. c 1149, d. 1216
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationGrecia de Briwere was also known as Grace.
Married NameHer married name was de Braose.

Children of Grecia de Briwere and Reginald de Braose

Anselm Marshal

M, b. 1198, d. 22 December 1245
Father*William Marshal b. 1146, d. 14 May 1219
Mother*Isabel de Clare b. 1172, d. 1220
     Anselm Marshal (died 23 December 1245) was the sixth Earl of Pembroke (of the second creation) and Earl Marshal of England, the youngest and last of the five sons of William Marshal to hold that post. He succeeded his brother Walter on 24 November 1245 and lived for a month, dying at Chepstow Castle and being buried in Tintern Abbey.

When William Marshal was composing his will in 1219, he originally intended to allot nothing to his youngest son, Anselm, who was named after William's younger brother. It has been suspected that he wished for the young Anselm to rise from low rank to high on his own merits as William himself had done as a young knight errant. His advisors, however, convinced the ailing Marshal to grant Anselm a small piece of land.

Anselm was married to Maud, the daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex. They had no children and Anselm's estates were divided between his four surviving sisters, Isabella, Sibyl, Eva, and Joan, and their husbands. The earldom of Pembroke lay vacant until 1247, when it was recreated for William de Valence, husband of Joan de Munchensi, heiress of Anselm's sister Joan and her husband Warin de Munchensi.1 6th Earl of Pembroke.

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anselm_Marshal,_6th_Earl_of_Pembroke.

Maud De Bohun

F, d. circa 1252
Father*Humphrey IV De Bohun b. c 1208, d. 24 Sep 1275
Mother*Maud de Lusignan b. 1210, d. 14 Aug 1241
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Marshal.
Married Namecirca 1250As of circa 1250,her married name was de Quincy.

Isabella de Braose

F, b. circa 1222
Father*William de Braose b. c 1197, d. 2 May 1230
Mother*Eva Marshal b. 1203, d. 1246
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was ap Llywelyn.

Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn

M, b. circa 1215, d. 1246
Father*Prince Llywelyn the Great ab Iorwerth b. c 1173, d. 11 Apr 1240
Mother*Lady Joan (?)

Eve de Braose

F, b. circa 1227, d. July 1255
Father*William de Braose b. c 1197, d. 2 May 1230
Mother*Eva Marshal b. 1203, d. 1246
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was de Cantelou.

Prince Llywelyn the Great ab Iorwerth

M, b. circa 1173, d. 11 April 1240
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationPrince Llywelyn the Great ab Iorwerth was also known as of Wales.
     Llywelyn the Great (Welsh: Llywelyn Fawr, Welsh: [??'w?l?n]), full name Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, (c. 1173 – 11 April 1240) was a Prince of Gwynedd in north Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. He is occasionally called Llywelyn I of Wales.[1] By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for forty years, and was one of only two Welsh rulers to be called 'the Great'.

Llywelyn's main home and court throughout his reign was at Garth Celyn on the north coast of Gwynedd, between Bangor and Conwy, overlooking the port of Llanfaes; he also had a hunting lodge in the uplands at Trefriw.[2] Throughout the thirteenth century, up to the Edwardian conquest, Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, was in effect the capital of Wales. (Garth Celyn is now known as Pen y Bryn, Bryn Llywelyn, Abergwyngregyn and parts of the medieval buildings still remain).[3]

During Llywelyn's boyhood, Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who split the kingdom between them, following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd, in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200, and made a treaty with King John of England that year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's natural daughter Joan, in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208, Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210, relations deteriorated and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all lands east of the River Conwy but was able to recover them the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign the Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216, he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor, Henry III, in 1218. During the next fifteen years, Llywelyn was frequently involved in fights with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240, and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn.1

Children of Prince Llywelyn the Great ab Iorwerth and Joan Plantagenet

Children of Prince Llywelyn the Great ab Iorwerth and Lady Joan (?)

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llywelyn_the_Great

Matilda de Braose

F
Father*Reginald de Braose b. c 1171, d. Jun 1228
Mother*Grecia de Briwere b. 1186, d. 1251
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Mechyll.

Rhys Mechyll

M, d. 1244
Father*Rhys the Hoarse Gryg d. 1234
     Prince of Deheubarth.

William de Braose

M, b. circa 1144, d. 9 August 1211
Father*William de Braose b. 1112, d. 1192
Mother*Bertha of Hereford b. 1130
     4th Lord of Bramber. William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber (1144/1153 – 9 August 1211), court favourite of King John of England, at the peak of his power, was also Lord of Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick, Glamorgan, Skenfrith, Briouze in Normandy, Grosmont, and White Castle.

William was the most notable member of the de Braose dynasty and his steady rise and sudden fall at the hands of King John is often taken as an example of that king's arbitrary and capricious behaviour towards his barons.

William was the son of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber and his wife Bertha of Hereford, also known as Bertha de Pitres, (born 1130) daughter of Miles Fitz Walter, Earl of Hereford and his wife, Sibyl, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche. From his father he inherited the Rape of Bramber, in Sussex, and through his mother he inherited a large estate in the Welsh Marches area of modern day Monmouthshire.1

Children of William de Braose and Matilda de St. Valery

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_4th_Lord_of_Bramber.

Matilda de St. Valery

F, b. 1155, d. 1210
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationMatilda de St. Valery was also known as Maud.
Married Namecirca 1166As of circa 1166,her married name was de Braose.
     Maud de Braose (1155-1210) was the wife of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, a powerful Marcher baron and court favourite of King John of England. She would later incur the wrath and enmity of the King. She is also known to history as Matilda de Braose, Moll Wallbee, and Lady of La Haie.[1]

She was born Maud de St. Valéry in France in about 1155, the child of Bernard de St. Valéry[2][3] and his first wife, Matilda. Her paternal grandfather was Reginald de St. Valery (died c.1162).

She had many siblings and half-siblings, including Thomas de St. Valery (died 1219), who was a son of Bernard by his second wife Eleanor de Domnart. Thomas married Adele de Ponthieu, by whom he had a daughter, Annora, who in her turn married Robert III, Count of Dreux, by whom she had issue. Thomas fought on the French side, at the Battle of Bouvines on 27 July 1214.[4]

Sometime around 1166, Maud married William de Braose, Lord Abergavenny, 4th Lord of Bramber (1144/1153-9 August 1211), son of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford de Pitres. He also held the lordships of Gower, Hay, Brecon, Radnor, Builth, Abergavenny, Kington, Painscastle, Skenfrith, Grosmont, White Castle and Briouze in Normandy. When King John of England ascended the throne in 1199, he became a court favourite and was also awarded the lordship of Limerick, Ireland. Maud had a marriage portion, Tetbury from her father's estate.

Maud supported her husband's military ambitions and he put her in charge of Hay Castle and surrounding territory. She is often referred to in history as the Lady of Hay. In 1198, Maud defended Painscastle in Elfael against a massive Welsh attack led by Gwenwynwyn, Prince of Powys. She successfully held off Gwenwynwyn's forces for three weeks until English reinforcements arrived. Over three thousand Welsh were killed. Painscastle was known as Matilda's Castle by the locals.[5]

Maud and William are reputed to have had 16 children.1

Children of Matilda de St. Valery and William de Braose

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_de_Braose

William de Braose

M, b. 1112, d. 1192
Father*Philip de Braose b. c 1070, d. bt 1131 - 1139
Mother*Aenor of Totnes b. 1084
     William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles, extended St Mary de Haura Church in Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He died in about 1192 and was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William. He had also fathered two daughters, Maud and Sibilla, who married well and possibly a later son, named John.1 3rd Lord of Bramber.

Children of William de Braose and Bertha of Hereford

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber.

Bertha of Hereford

F, b. 1130
Father*Miles de Gloucester b. 1100, d. 24 Dec 1143
Mother*Sibyl de Neufmarche
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationBertha of Hereford was also known as de Pitres.
Married Name1150As of 1150,her married name was de Braose.
     Bertha of Hereford, also known as Bertha de Pitres (born c.1130), was the daughter of Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, and a wealthy heiress. She was the wife of William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber to whom she brought many castles and Lordships, including Brecknock, Abergavenny, and Hay.

Bertha was born in England in about 1130. She was the second daughter[1] of Miles of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford (1097- 24 December 1143) and Sibyl of Neufmarche. She had two sisters, Margaret of Gloucester, who married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had issue, and Lucy of Gloucester, who married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, by whom she had issue. Her five brothers, included Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford, Walter de Hereford, Henry Fitzmiles, William de Hereford, and Mahel de Hereford.[2]

Her paternal grandparents were Walter FitzRoger de Pitres, Sheriff of Gloucester and Bertha de Balun of Bateden, a descendant of Hamelin de Balun. Her maternal grandparents were Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecon, and Nesta ferch Osbern. The latter was a daughter of Osbern FitzRichard of Richard's Castle, and Nesta ferch Gruffydd.[3] Bertha was a direct descendant, in the maternal line, of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (1007- 5 August 1063) and Edith (Aldgyth), daughter of Elfgar, Earl of Mercia.

Her father Miles served as Constable to King Stephen of England. He later served in the same capacity to Empress Matilda after he'd transferred his allegiance. In 1141, she made him Earl of Hereford in gratitude for his loyalty. On 24 December 1143, he was killed whilst on a hunting expedition.

In 1150, she married William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (1112- 1192), son of Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber and Aenor, daughter of Judael of Totnes. William and Bertha had three daughters and two sons, including William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber.

In 1173[2], her brothers all having died without issue, she brought the Lordships and castles of Brecknock and Abergavenny, to her husband. Hay Castle had already passed to her from her mother, Sibyl of Neufmarche in 1165, whence it became part of the de Braose holdings.

In 1174, her husband became Sheriff of Hereford.1

Children of Bertha of Hereford and William de Braose

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_of_Hereford

Miles de Gloucester

M, b. 1100, d. 24 December 1143
Father*Walter de Gloucester b. 1065, d. 1129
Mother*Bertha de Balun
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationMiles de Gloucester was also known as of Gloucester.
Name VariationMiles de Gloucester was also known as Milo.
Name VariationMiles de Gloucester was also known as Fitz Walter.
Name VariationMiles de Gloucester was also known as of Hereford.
     Earl of Hereford. Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, Lord of Brecknock (1100–24 December 1143), was the son of Walter de Gloucester, who appears as sheriff of that county between 1104 and 1121.

Milo or Miles succeeded his father about the latter year.

He was high in the service of Henry I between 1130 and 1135, he was Constable of England and combined the hereditary office of Sheriff of Gloucester with that of local justiciar for Gloucestershire.

After the death of King Henry he declared for Stephen, at whose court he appears as constable in 1136. King Stephen granted him the honour of Gloucester and Brecknock. However, in 1139, when the empress Matilda appeared in England, he declared for her, and placed the city of Gloucester at her disposal; he was further distinguished by sacking the nearby royalist city of Worcester, attacking Stephen's siege works at Wallingford Castle and reducing the county of Hereford. He was retained as her Constable.

In 1141, he was rewarded with the earldom of Hereford when Matilda ruled the country. He remained loyal to the Empress after her defeat at Winchester the same year. John of Salisbury classes him with Geoffrey de Mandeville and others who were non tam comites regni quam hostes publici. The charge is justified by his public policy; but the materials for appraising his personal character do not exist.

He married Sybil de Neufmarche, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecon and Nest, granddaughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, in 1121.1

Children of Miles de Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarche

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_of_Gloucester

Sibyl de Neufmarche

F
Father*Bernard de Neufmarche b. c 1050, d. c 1125
Mother*Agnes ferch Osbern
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Fitz Walter.
Married Name1121As of 1121,her married name was de Gloucester.

Children of Sibyl de Neufmarche and Miles de Gloucester

Bernard de Neufmarche

M, b. circa 1050, d. circa 1125
Father*Geoffrey de Neufmarche
Mother*Ada de Hugleville
     Bernard of Neufmarché or Newmarket (c. 1050 – c. 1125) was "the first of the original conquerors of Wales."[1] He was a minor Norman lord who rose to power in the Welsh Marches before successfully undertaking the invasion and conquest of the Kingdom of Brycheiniog between 1088 and 1095. Out of the ruins of the Welsh kingdom he created the Anglo-Norman lordship of Brecon.

Because Bernard's family had attachments to the monastery of Saint-Evroul-sur-Ouche, the monkish chronicler Orderic Vitalis of that foundation had special knowledge of him and his family, though this still does not reduce the general obscurity of his origins or his life when compared to the richer Marcher lords, like the great Roger of Montgomery.[2] Bernard was the son of the minor and incompetent Norman baron Geoffrey de Neufmarché and Ada de Hugleville,[3] and he was born at the castle of Le-Neuf-Marché-en-Lions on the frontier between Normandy and Beauvais.[4] His ancestors on his mother's side had founded the town of Aufay south of Dieppe on the Sie, while his paternal grandfather, Turketil had served the young William II of Normandy as a guardian and was killed in that capacity. On his mother's side he also descended from Richard II of Normandy.[5]1

Children of Bernard de Neufmarche and Agnes ferch Osbern

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_de_Neufmarche

Matilda de Braose

F
Father*William de Braose b. c 1144, d. 9 Aug 1211
Mother*Matilda de St. Valery b. 1155, d. 1210
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was ap Rhys II.
Name VariationMatilda de Braose was also known as Maud.

Prince Gruffydd ap Rhys II

M, d. 1201
Father*Rhys ap Gruffydd b. 1132, d. 28 Apr 1197
Mother*Gwenllian ferch Madog
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationPrince Gruffydd ap Rhys II was also known as of Deheubarth.

Margaret de Braose

F
Father*William de Braose b. c 1144, d. 9 Aug 1211
Mother*Matilda de St. Valery b. 1155, d. 1210
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was de Lacy.

Walter de Lacy

M, b. before 1170, d. 24 February 1240

Sibilla de Braose

F
Father*William de Braose b. 1112, d. 1192
Mother*Bertha of Hereford b. 1130
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was de Ferrers.
Name VariationSibilla de Braose was also known as Sibylla.

Child of Sibilla de Braose and William de Ferrers

Maud de Braose

F
Father*William de Braose b. 1112, d. 1192
Mother*Bertha of Hereford b. 1130
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was de Brompton.

Philip de Braose

M, b. circa 1070, d. between 1131 and 1139
Father*William de Braose b. 1049, d. bt 1093 - 1096
Mother*Agnes de St. Clare b. bt 1048 - 1054, d. 1080
     2nd Lord of Bramber. Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber was a Norman nobleman whose father, William de Braose (d.1093–1096) had participated in the victory over the English Saxons at the Battle of Hastings in support of William the Conqueror.

William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber had been rewarded with a Barony and lands in Sussex and the Welsh Marches of Wales. Philip was born about 1070 to 1073 in Bramber, his mother being Agnes de St. Clare (born 1048 to 1054) (died 1080) of Barnstaple in Devon. Philip's task as heir was to consolidate these lands and expand them wherever possible. In 1096 he confirmed his father's gifts to the Abbey of St. Florent. Through marriage to Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes or Totenais (born 1084) he also acquired land in Totnes, Devon and held this valuable Lordship also.

It was Philip de Braose who conquered the Welsh borderlands at Builth and New Radnor and established new Norman Lordships over them as a Marcher Lord. He seems to have gone on the First Crusade in 1103. He was responsible for the building of St. Nicolas' Church, Old Shoreham in Sussex and founded the port at New Shoreham.

He supported King Henry I of England against Robert Curthose and then in 1110 revolted against King Henry I of England who confiscated his estates as a result.

He regained his Lordships and his lands in 1112 and was thereafter able to retain them, in 1130 passing them intact to his eldest son in turn, named William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber. He also fathered a second son, also called Philip and two daughters, Basilia and Gillian. It is thought that he died between 1131 and 1139, possibly 1134 on a crusade in the Holy Land.1

Children of Philip de Braose and Aenor of Totnes

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_de_Braose

Aenor of Totnes

F, b. 1084
Father*Judael of Totnes
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationAenor of Totnes was also known as Fitz Judhel.
Married NameHer married name was de Braose.

Children of Aenor of Totnes and Philip de Braose

Judael of Totnes

M
     Juhel of Totnes[1] was a Breton nobleman and supporter of William I of England of the eleventh century.

He was in 1069 one of the leaders of Breton forces on the Norman side, fighting against the remaining forces that had been loyal to Harold II of England[2] He was Lord of Totnes, and holder of many manors in south-west England, at the time of the Domesday Survey (1086)[3]. He was however dispossessed or pushed out of Totnes shortly afterward. According to Frank Barlow[4] William II of England

replaced the Breton Judhel, whom he expelled from Totnes at the beginning of his reign for an unknown reason, with his favourite, Roger (I) of Nonant.

His daughter Aenor married Philip de Braose[5], son of William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber.1

Child of Judael of Totnes

Citations

  1. [S369] Encyclopedia website, by compilation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juhel_of_Totnes

Mary A. Mullen

F, b. 1800, d. 8 May 1867
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Namebefore 1827As of before 1827,her married name was Hopkins.
  • Mary A. Mullen was born in 1800 at Pennsylvania also reported as 1805.
  • She married John Hopkins, son of Humphrey Hopkins and Sarah (?), before 1827.
  • Mary A. Mullen died on 8 May 1867.
  • She was buried after 8 May 1867 at Smelser Cemetery, Georgetown, Grant, Wisconsin.
    Mary (Mullen) Hopkins tombstone - Smelser Cemetery, Grant, WI
Census DateLocation
10 September 1850Eastern District, Grant, WisconsinMary A. Mullen was listed in John Hopkins's household on the 1850 Census at Eastern District, Grant, Wisconsin.1
27 July 1860Smelser, Grant, WisconsinMary A. Mullen was listed in John Hopkins's household on the 1860 Census at Smelser, Grant, Wisconsin.2

Children of Mary A. Mullen and John Hopkins

Citations

  1. [S249] U.S. Federal Census 1850 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1850; Census Place: Eastern District, Grant, Wisconsin; Roll M432_998; Page: 126B; Image: 167.
  2. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1860; Census Place: Smelser, Grant, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1409; Page: 688; Image: 708; Family History Library Film: 805409.

Frederick Hopkins

M, b. circa 1827
Father*John Hopkins b. c 1802, d. a Jun 1880
Mother*Mary A. Mullen b. 1800, d. 8 May 1867
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationFrederick Hopkins was also known as Fred.
Census DateLocation
27 July 1860Smelser, Grant, WisconsinFrederick Hopkins was listed in John Hopkins's household on the 1860 Census at Smelser, Grant, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1860; Census Place: Smelser, Grant, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1409; Page: 688; Image: 708; Family History Library Film: 805409.