Bessie W. Franklin

F, b. November 1892
Father*Burrell S. Franklin b. Jul 1853, d. 30 Aug 1942
Mother*Emeline H. Goodwin b. Aug 1847, d. 21 Feb 1931
Census DateLocation
June 1900Swift Creek, Wake, North CarolinaBessie W. Franklin was listed as a daughter in Burrell S. Franklin's household on the 1900 Census at Swift Creek, Wake, North Carolina.1

Citations

  1. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Swift Creek, Wake, North Carolina; Roll T623_1221; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 150.

(?) Goodwin

M

Children of (?) Goodwin

Martha H. Goodwin

F, b. November 1837, d. after June 1900
Father*(?) Goodwin
  • Martha H. Goodwin was born in November 1837 at North Carolina.
  • She was the daughter of (?) Goodwin.
  • As of 1900, Martha H. Goodwin was never married.
  • She died after June 1900.
Census DateLocation
June 1900Swift Creek, Wake, North CarolinaMartha H. Goodwin was listed as a sister-in-law in Burrell S. Franklin's household on the 1900 Census at Swift Creek, Wake, North Carolina.1

Citations

  1. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Swift Creek, Wake, North Carolina; Roll T623_1221; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 150.

Antonie Grignon

M, b. 9 January 1828, d. 24 July 1913
Antoine Grignon
Father*Amable Grignon b. c 1803, d. c 1836
Mother*Archange La Bathe b. c 1803, d. c 1860
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationAntonie Grignon was also known as Anthony.
Name VariationAntonie Grignon was also known as Antoine.
Name VariationAntonie Grignon was also known as Antone.
Name VariationAntonie Grignon was also known as Antony.
  • Antonie Grignon was born on 9 January 1828 at Fort Crawford, Prairie du Chien, Crawford, Michigan.
  • He was the son of Amable Grignon and Archange La Bathe.
  • Antonie Grignon married Mary Christine de La Ronde, daughter of John de La Ronde and Elizabeth DeKaury, in 1850.
  • Antonie Grignon died on 24 July 1913 at age 85 Antonie Grignon Dies at His Home in Trempealeau, Wis. Winona, Minn., July 24 - (Special.) Antonio Grignon, 86 years old, the oldest settler in this section, died yesterday at his home at Trempealeau. He was educated at Prairie Du Chien, Wis., by Zachary Taylor, colonel in the barracks there before he became president. In the early days Grignon became a fur dealer among the Sioux and Winnagago Indians and was subsequently employed as an interpreter by the federal government. He aided the government in negotiating treties and explaining the technicalities to the Redskins. He was especially helpful at the time of the transfer of the tribes to Blue Earth and Long Prairie, Minn. He operated as a trader at St. Paul when it was merely a trading post and high wheeled wagons along were in use. Grignon's grandfather on his mother's side was the famous Chief Wah Pah Sha, the Sioux Indian, whose village was located where Winona now is situated.
Census DateLocation
1850Black River, Crawford, WisconsinAntonie Grignon was listed with the Hardin Perkins family on the 1850 Census at Black River, Crawford, Wisconsin.1
12 July 1860Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHe was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHe was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.3
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHe was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.4
1900Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHe was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.5
1910Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHe was listed as the head of a family on the 1910 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin, household includes grandson Frank J. Pearson, born circa 1883 Wisconsin.6
     In 1917 History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917: Chapter 10: Recollections of Antoine Grignon -As transcribed from pages 129 - 136 (Eben D. Pierce, Wis. Hist. Soc. Proceedings, 1913, 110 - 136) I was born at old Fort Crawford, Prairie du Chien, January 9, 1828. My father, Amable Grignon, who was of French and Winnebago descent, was born at Portage, Wisconsin; my mother, Archange La Bathe, was born at Prairie du Chien, of a French father and Sioux mother, being a cousin of Wabashaw, the Sioux chief whose village was located on the site of Winona, Minnesota. She was a sister of Francois La Bathe, the noted trader, long a trusted employee of the American Fur Company. Amable Grignon acted as interpreter for the Federal Government on various occasions, and was stationed for a number of years at Fort Crawford as interpreter for its commandant, Colonel Zachary Taylor.

There were three children in the family, Paul, Archange, and myself, and although our parents had but a limited education, they determined to give their children the best opportunities within their reach. So I was taken to Col. Zachary Taylor, who permitted me to attend the school conducted in the garrison, thus laying the foundation for an education.

I next went for two terms to a private school conducted by a Mr. Cady [Cadle], then John Haney became my teacher. There were no public schools in that day at Prairie du Chien, and the parents of the pupils in the private schools paid the teacher a certain amount each month for their instruction. I remember, too, my French teacher, a Mr. Gibault, who also taught English, and a lady by the name of Mrs. Crosby, who held school in her home.

When I was a little past twelve years of age I went to school to Rev. Joseph Cretin, a Catholic clergyman, who afterwards became bishop in St. Paul. By the time I was fifteen years of age I had a fair education in the common branches of English and was ready to go out into the world better equipped than most French Canadian boys of my time.

When I was fifteen years old I went to work for the American Fur Company under a sub-agent named Alexis P. Bailly, of Wabasha, Minnesota. I was sent out to Turkey River, Iowa. We went by wagon, fifty miles southwest of Prairie du Chien, where a store building was erected and trade opened among the Winnebago. A few months later I came back to Prairie du Chien, and went by the steamboat "Otter" up the Mississippi to Trempealeau, which was then known as Reed's Landing or Reed's Town. James Reed had married my widowed mother and I visited her at his home, a large log house near the river.

There were but a few families in Reed's Town. John B. Doville and family were living there. He had been conducting a wood yard over on the island opposite Trempealeau for a few years, having been sent in 1838 by Francois La Bathe to occupy the island and furnish cord-wood for the steamboats passing up and down the river. Joseph Reed, a French Canadian, accompanied him.

The real object in holding the island the island was to secure the fur trade, and to keep Wabashaw's band of Sioux from giving their trade to rival companies.

Doville was quite an agriculturist; he cultivated the land formerly broken by Louis Stram at the Swiss mission, and also broke up more on the flat near where the city park is now located. He sowed oats, wheat, flaxseed, potatoes, and beans. He has the honor, I think, of being the first farmer in Trempealeau County. Stram broke the first land, but did not sow any seed except for garden purposes.

Alexander Chenevert was living upon the site that afterwards became the old Grant place. Farther up the river near Fred Ford's present residence, lived the Bunnells - Willard and Lafayette. Willard lived here until 1848, when he moved across into Minnesota. Lafayette Bunnell had moved to Minnesota a couple of years before his brother Willard. There was another Frenchman here at that time by the name of Michael Goulet, who chopped wood for Reed, and worked at odd jobs whenever opportunity offered. He did not remain long, a few years perhaps, and then went farther north.

I worked for Mr. Reed, who was farmer for Wabashaw's band of Sioux at Winona, and as he could get home only occasionally I helped look after his stock, and built some pole fences for him in the fall of 1843, on what afterwards became the Van Engen farm. This was the first fence built in the county. Reed had considerable stock, several head of cattle, a bunch of ponies, and some blooded horses. They grazed on the hills, and out on Trempealeau Prairie, and required little attention summer or winter, although we always put up some wild hay for them in case deep snow should make the grazing difficult. Cattle suffered more during the deep snow than the horses, who could more easily paw the snow away.

In 1844 a Frenchman, Assalin, came to Reed's Town. He was a carpenter by trade, and manufactured for Mr. Reed the first wagon in the county, that is, he made the woodwork, but the iron had to be shipped up from Prairie du Chien. Besides carpenter work and wagon-making Assalin manufactured sleds and French trains.

In speaking of these early French settlers I must not forget to mention Peter Rousseau, who helped Reed build his house. Rousseau was an expert with a broad-ax, and hewed the logs for Reed's house. This had two stories, and was large and roomy, and served well its purpose as an old-fashion backwoods inn.

Reed kept a bar, and I have often seen travelers sleeping on the floor rolled up in their blankets. Beds were a luxury seldom indulged in at that period. Around the old-fashioned fireplace in Reed's inn was often gathered a strange and varied company - traders, surveyors, trappers, and hunters, and a few blanketed Indians. As they sat smoking by the blazing fire in the evening, you might have heard stories of adventure that would thrill the heart of the dullest listener.

About the same year, 1844, there came to Trempealeau (Reed's Town) a Frenchman by the name of Antoine La Terreur, who was a cabinet-maker. He manufactured chairs, bureaus, chests, and other furniture, and was the first in our county to do work of that kind. Some of the chairs he manufactured are still, or were a few years ago, in the possession of La Vigne in Cedar Valley, Minnesota.

In 1845, Michel Bebault came here and hired out as a wood-chopper over on the island at the steamboat wood yard. He was about the best wood-chopper I ever saw at work. Three years later Leander Bebault and John La Vigne came with their families to settle in Trempealeau. La Vigne bought a little piece of land up in the tamarack, but had not lived there long when he decided to move across the river into Minnesota, where he settled in Cedar Valley.

Joseph Reed became a mail-carrier, and I think it worth while to relate some of the hardships he underwent in performing his duty. His route lay along the Mississippi from Prairie du Chien to Wabashaw's village at Winona. At the latter place he met the mail-carrier from Fort Snelling, near St. Paul, and after exchanging mails the two returned to their respective starting points. The trip was made by canoe in summer, and by French train on the river ice in winter, and by pony with saddle-bags at times when neither canoe nor French train could be used.

One year, in the latter part of winter, early in March, I think, Joseph Reed started from Prairie du Chien with the government mail bound for Winona. When he arrived the carrier from St. Paul was not there. It was mild weather, so Reed concluded to proceed on his journey until he met his partner from up river. By the time he reached Holmes' Landing, the weather had grown considerably warmer, and the ice showed signs of breaking up. Still he pushed on, and urging his pony over the ice, sped away towards the north. On nearing Minneiska19 he heard the ice begin to give way - groan, crack, and move; looking about he saw that an island in the river offered his only place of escape from drowning, as the ice was fast breaking up. He made his way thither, and arriving in safety started to explore his new quarters. He had gone but a short distance when he ran across the St. Paul mail-carrier, who had likewise made the island in safety. By this time the ice in the river was moving fast, and before another day had nearly cleared. So there they were with little provision, shut off from mainland by a wide channel.

After their provisions gave out, they subsisted on rose-apples; they halloed in vain for help, but it was a sparsely-settled region at that time and no one heard them. After living on the island nearly two weeks, they were rescued by a party of Sioux who were coming down the river in canoes. The Sioux took the two mail-carriers into their canoes and left them at Holmes' Landing, where after two weeks of recuperation they resumed their routes. They were weak, emaciated, and nearly starved to death.

I remained in Trempealeau until the year before the Mexican War broke out, when I returned to Prairie du Chien and went to work in a blacksmith shop. When war with Mexico was declared, I enlisted in Governor Dodge's regiment of hoe guards, serving therein for a year. We did not go out of the State, but were held in readiness in case we should be needed. While in service at Prairie du Chien during the winter of 1846-47, a report came to our commander that the Indians were massacring the whites in the locality where Vernon County now is. We were ordered out and with great difficulty marched up through the deep snow to the supposed scene of murder. When we arrived we found the report was false; the whites had not been disturbed in the least, and no Indians had been seen in that region for a number of weeks. So we returned ingloriously to our quarters at Prairie du Chien.

After getting my discharge I went to work as clerk for the American Fur Company in their store at Prairie du Chien under B. N. Brisbois. I remained in their employ until June, 1849, when I decided to go north and took the steamboat, "Lady Franklin," for St. Paul.

I soon secured employment at Fort Snelling, helping to get up hay for the cavalry stationed there at the time. I drove team and helped stack for a few weeks, when a man from St. Paul came and asked if I would run a boarding-house and bar for him at that place. I complied with his request, and worked for him for two months; at the end of this time I went down the river in one of A. P. Bailly's boats as far as Wabasha, where I went to work for Bailly. he was postmaster, and I carried the mail to and from the boats and also worked in the store as clerk. While there I was appointed deputy sheriff, and served papers on a man who was accused of stealing goods from my employer. I had a search warrant and went and looked over the man's house, but found none of the stolen goods in his possession.

In the winter of 1849 Bailly fixed me up a big load of goods on a French train, with a pony to haul it down the river; I took my departure for the site of Fountain City, where there was a large camp of Sioux. I traded among them until the spring of 1850, when I loaded my goods in a canoe and made my way down the river and through the sloughs to the present site of Marshland, where there was also a Sioux camp. I sold my pony and train to the Indians and bought a canoe of them, and traded with them for a number of weeks. They had been trapping up Trempealeau River, and had a fine lot of beaver, otter, marten, mink, and muskrat pelts. I had for my store a Sioux hut made out of buffalo hides - as comfortable as one could wish. After the spring hunting and trapping was over I returned to Wabasha, but not until I had an opportunity of attending a medicine dance at Minneowah, not far above the present town of Homer, Minnesota.

In the early fifties I assisted H. M. Rice, S. B. Lowry and David Olmsted in removing two bands of Winnebagoes from a point near Sugar Loaf, Winona, and a point on French Island, a few miles above La Crosse, to the Long Prairie reservation in central Minnesota. A few months later I secured employment with the Hudson Bay Co. at Long Prairie.

In 1854, I returned to Trempealeau and remained at home with my family until 1856. In the latter year Nathan Myrick, the pioneer settler of La Crosse, wrote me a letter asking me to take charge as interpreter of his store at Blue Earth, Minnesota. Accordingly I went to Blue Earth and began work for Myrick. The Winnebago had meanwhile been removed from Long Prairie to the Blue Earth agency, and Myrick opened a store at the latter place secure their trade. Myrick told me to trust all Indians that were honest, but to look out for the rascals, and said, "You have traded with them a long time and know them well and so you know the goods ones from the bad ones." I trusted them to the amount of over $3,000, and when they received their government annuity I got all the money they owed me, or very nearly all; I think I lost less than ten dollars in dealing with them.

I remained at Blue Earth until winter and then returned home to Trempealeau. I did not like the Prairie country and I wanted to be with my family, although Myrick offered to fix up a place where my family could stay at Blue Earth.

In 1850, I married Mary Christine de La Ronde, a girl from Portage, Wisconsin. Fourteen children were born to us, six of whom are still living, three boys and three girls. The girls when they were young ladies were noted in this part of the country for their singing; one of them became a school teacher and was very successful in her work.

In 1881, Major Halleck came from Washington, D. C., to enumerate the Winnebago, and wrote for me to assist him in the work. We went to Eland Junction and enumerated Big Black Hawk's band,30 and then proceeded to Black River Falls; after completing the work there, we went to Portage and Kilbourn, and wherever we could locate a camp of this tribe. Next spring I went with Major Halleck to Stevens Point to make a payment to the Indians and was with him a year, and whenever a payment was made I helped to locate and get the names of the Indians on the pay-roll. I also helped survey the land above Black River Falls, and assisted in locating the Indians on their homesteads. I have acted as interpreter on various occasions for the Federal Government, and on matters of business have helped the Indians whenever I could. I have lived here most of the time since I quit work for Myrick, and have always made my home in Trempealeau, being away only on business for short intervals. I live in the same house that I bought in 1857.

Children of Antonie Grignon and Mary Christine de La Ronde

Citations

  1. [S249] U.S. Federal Census 1850 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1850; Census Place: Black River, Crawford, Wisconsin; Roll M432_995; Page: 264A; Image: 62.
  2. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, r: 1860; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1434; Page: 58; Image: 64; Family History Library Film: 805434.
  3. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.
  4. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.
  5. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll T623_ 1819; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 137.
  6. [S244] U.S. Federal Census 1910 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1910; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll T624_1739; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 173; Image: 1071.

Mary Christine de La Ronde

F, b. December 1835, d. before 1910
Father*John de La Ronde
Mother*Elizabeth DeKaury
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Name1850As of 1850,her married name was Grignon.
Census DateLocation
12 July 1860Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinMary Christine de La Ronde was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1860 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinMary Christine de La Ronde was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinMary Christine de La Ronde was listed as wife in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.3
1900Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinMary Christine de La Ronde was listed as wife in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1900 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.4
     Mary Christine de La Ronde had 14 with 7 living in 1900 children.

Children of Mary Christine de La Ronde and Antonie Grignon

Citations

  1. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, r: 1860; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1434; Page: 58; Image: 64; Family History Library Film: 805434.
  2. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.
  3. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.
  4. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll T623_ 1819; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 137.

Ralph J. Grignon

M, b. circa 1861, d. 1923
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationRalph J. Grignon was also known as Raphael.
  • Ralph J. Grignon was born circa 1861 at Trempealeau, Wisconsin.
  • He was the son of Antonie Grignon and Mary Christine de La Ronde.
  • Ralph J. Grignon married Selma Daron on 1 November 1914 at St. Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota.
  • Ralph J. Grignon and Selma Daron were divorced on 18 March 1919 at Manistee, Manistee, Michigan.
  • Ralph J. Grignon died in 1923.
Census DateLocation
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinRalph J. Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinRalph J. Grignon was listed as a son in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2

Child of Ralph J. Grignon and Selma Daron

Citations

  1. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.
  2. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Agatha Grignon

F, b. circa 1865, d. before 1917
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationAgatha Grignon was also known as Apollina.
Census DateLocation
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinAgatha Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinAgatha Grignon was listed as a daughter in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2

Citations

  1. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.
  2. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Alexander Grignon

M, b. 9 January 1869, d. 24 September 1917
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationAlexander Grignon was also known as Alex.
Name VariationAlexander Grignon was also known as Adomas.
Census DateLocation
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinAlexander Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinAlexander Grignon was listed as a son in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2

Citations

  1. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.
  2. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Waline Grignon

F, b. circa 1871, d. before 1917
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Census DateLocation
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinWaline Grignon was listed as a daughter in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Antonette Grignon

F, b. circa 1873, d. 1952
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Coyle.
Name VariationAntonette Grignon was also known as Nettie.
Census DateLocation
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinAntonette Grignon was listed as a daughter in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Guy Adolphe Grignon

M, b. 18 October 1874, d. 1960
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Census DateLocation
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinGuy Adolphe Grignon was listed as a son in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Gertrude Grignon

F, b. circa 1878, d. before 1917
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Census DateLocation
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinGertrude Grignon was listed as a daughter in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Mary A. Grignon

F, b. 16 April 1853, d. after 1917
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationMary A. Grignon was also known as Marietta A.
Married NameHer married name was Jebb.
Census DateLocation
12 July 1860Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinMary A. Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1860 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinMary A. Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2

Citations

  1. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, r: 1860; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1434; Page: 58; Image: 64; Family History Library Film: 805434.
  2. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.

Josephine Grignon

F, b. circa 1857, d. before 1917
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Name TypeDateDescription
Married Namebefore 1878As of before 1878,her married name was Wagoner.
Census DateLocation
12 July 1860Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinJosephine Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1860 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
1870Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinJosephine Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1870 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinJosephine Grignon was listed as a daughter in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.3

Children of Josephine Grignon and (?) Wagoner

Citations

  1. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, r: 1860; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1434; Page: 58; Image: 64; Family History Library Film: 805434.
  2. [S247] U.S. Federal Census 1870 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1870; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M593_1737; Page: 267A; Image: 537; Family History Library Film: 553236.
  3. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Amable Grignon

M, b. circa 1803, d. circa 1836
     Amable Grignon acted as interpreter for the Federal Government on various occasions, and was stationed for a number of years at Fort Crawford as interpreter for its commandant, Colonel Zachary Taylor.

Children of Amable Grignon and Archange La Bathe

Archange La Bathe

F, b. circa 1803, d. circa 1860
Father*Michael La Bathe b. 1781, d. 1815
Mother*Angelique Wapasha b. b 1787, d. 1855
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was Grignon.
Married Name7 October 1844As of 7 October 1844,her married name was Reed.
  • Archange La Bathe married Amable Grignon.
  • Archange La Bathe was born circa 1803 at Prairie du Chien, Crawford, Michigan.
  • She was the daughter of Michael La Bathe and Angelique Wapasha.
  • Archange La Bathe married James Reed on 7 October 1844 at second marriage for her.
  • Archange La Bathe died circa 1860.

Children of Archange La Bathe and Amable Grignon

Michael La Bathe

M, b. 1781, d. 1815
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationMichael La Bathe was also known as LaBatte.

Children of Michael La Bathe and Angelique Wapasha

Francois La Bathe

M, b. circa 1799
Father*Michael La Bathe b. 1781, d. 1815
Mother*Angelique Wapasha b. b 1787, d. 1855

Paul Grignon

M, b. 1831, d. 1899
Father*Amable Grignon b. c 1803, d. c 1836
Mother*Archange La Bathe b. c 1803, d. c 1860

Archange Grignon

F, b. 1832, d. 1914
Father*Amable Grignon b. c 1803, d. c 1836
Mother*Archange La Bathe b. c 1803, d. c 1860

James Reed

M, b. 1798, d. 1873

(?) Wagoner

M

Children of (?) Wagoner and Josephine Grignon

Clement Wagoner

M, b. circa 1878
Father*(?) Wagoner
Mother*Josephine Grignon b. c 1857, d. b 1917
Census DateLocation
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinClement Wagoner was listed as a son in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.

Huber F. Wagoner

M, b. April 1880
Father*(?) Wagoner
Mother*Josephine Grignon b. c 1857, d. b 1917
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationHuber F. Wagoner was also known as Lubin F.
Census DateLocation
June 1880Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHuber F. Wagoner was listed as a grandson in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1880 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1
1900Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinHuber F. Wagoner was listed as a grandson in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1900 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.2

Citations

  1. [S246] U.S. Federal Census 1880 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, NA Film Number T9-1448 Page Number 179B.
  2. [S245] U.S. Federal Census 1900 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1900; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll T623_ 1819; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 137.

Robert Grignon

M, b. circa 1855, d. April 1870
Father*Antonie Grignon b. 9 Jan 1828, d. 24 Jul 1913
Mother*Mary Christine de La Ronde b. Dec 1835, d. b 1910
Census DateLocation
12 July 1860Trempealeau, Trempealeau, WisconsinRobert Grignon was listed in Antonie Grignon's household on the 1860 Census at Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S248] U.S. Federal Census 1860 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, r: 1860; Census Place: Trempealeau, Trempealeau, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1434; Page: 58; Image: 64; Family History Library Film: 805434.

Angelique Wapasha

F, b. before 1787, d. 1855
Father*Sioux Chief Wapasha I (?) b. c 1718, d. 5 Jan 1806
Name TypeDateDescription
Married NameHer married name was La Bathe.

Children of Angelique Wapasha and Michael La Bathe

Sioux Chief Wapasha I (?)

M, b. circa 1718, d. 5 January 1806
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationSioux Chief Wapasha I (?) was also known as Dakota Chief I Wapasha.
  • Sioux Chief Wapasha I (?) was born circa 1718.
  • He died on 5 January 1806.
     Wapasha I (Abt. 1720 - January 5, 1806) Wapasha I was the son of a Dakota chief and a Chippewa princess. Born in approximately 1720, he was the eldest of two sons. Despite his Chippewa blood, Wapasha I led the Sioux in several battles with his mother’s tribe. One such incident marks the first recorded reference of his name by the white men. After a band of Sioux warriors slew several Chippewa, a tribe which had been promised protection by the French, Wapasha and those with him on the raid offered to submit to French justice in order to keep peace with the incoming military forces of the Europeans. On March 9, 1740, the action was recorded by the commander of the French garrison at Mackinac, Michigan. No retribution was taken against the Sioux. After military defeats at the hands of the British in the middle 1700s, the French began to withdraw from lands they had formerly held in the Mississippi River valley. The French had enjoyed the loyalty of the Indians, who aided them in their defeat with the British. After the French defeat, the English were both suspicious and fearful of the Indians. As a result, there were no English trappers and traders bargaining with the Sioux. The Sioux had developed a dependency on such trade. They had become more accustomed to hunting with rifles than bows and arrows. Fur traded with French trappers brought provisions and ammunition and the Dakota found it difficult to survive without this commerce. Perhaps also fearing a war with the British, Wapasha I convened a council in 1763 to find a way to bring the British back to this area. Several incidents that took place during the French and Indian War made English trappers apprehensive about returning to the Mississippi River valley. One such incident took place in 1761. A Dakota named Ixkatapay had shot an English trader called Pagonta (Mallard Duck) by the Indians. The two had quarreled earlier, and Pagonta was reportedly killed while sitting in his cabin smoking. To appease the British, it was decided Ixkatapay would be turned over to them for the killing. Wapasha I led the party, composed of 100 men, to the English headquarters in Quebec. Wapasha’s enthusiasm for peace with the English was shared by the tribe, but evidently this did not extend to submitting one of their own to the justice of the British. By the time Wapasha had reached Green Bay, Wisconsin, there were only six of the original 100 left, Wapasha and five braves. The others had drifted off in small groups. One of these deserting bands had taken Ixkatapay with them and returned to their homelands. Wapasha I and the remaining five continued to Quebec and offered themselves as surrogates for Ixkatapay in the English court. He explained the plight of his people and their desire for peace, and asked the British to return to the area. Taken with his courage, the British awarded the Dakota chief seven military medals, hanging one around his neck in a ceremony at the fort. Trappers and traders soon returned to the area. During the American Revolution, the Sioux fought on the side of the British. Wapasha led his warriors against the Sauk and Fox forces which had sided with the rebelling colonists. In British military communiqués, he is referred to as General Wapasha. His aid in the British cause during the revolution was not forgotten. When he traveled to Montreal on one of his many visits to the British army commanders there, he was always greeted with the salute of a cannon. Wapasha I died of neck cancer January 5, 1806, at a camp on the Root River in Houston County, Minnesota. He was probably somewhere in his 80s when he died, ending a public career that spanned 66 years.
http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/4111597/person/200728069/comments?pg=32768.

Children of Sioux Chief Wapasha I (?)

Sioux Chief Wapasha II (?)

M, d. 1836
Father*Sioux Chief Wapasha I (?) b. c 1718, d. 5 Jan 1806
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationSioux Chief Wapasha II (?) was also known as Wapasha Dakota Chief II Wapasha.

Child of Sioux Chief Wapasha II (?)

Sioux Chief Wapasha III (?)

M, b. before 1836
Father*Sioux Chief Wapasha II (?) d. 1836

Martin J. Meister

M, b. 6 October 1925, d. 26 November 2013
Father*Martin Edward Meister b. 30 Jul 1900, d. 22 Dec 1970
Mother*Clara Theresa Nachreiner b. 12 Aug 1903, d. 3 Jul 1969
Name TypeDateDescription
Name VariationMartin J. Meister was also known as Bud.
  • Martin J. Meister was born on 6 October 1925 at Wisconsin.
  • He was the son of Martin Edward Meister and Clara Theresa Nachreiner.
  • Martin J. Meister died on 26 November 2013 at age 88 Martin J. “Bud” Meister, age 88, of Reedsburg, passed away Tuesday, November 26, 2013.

    Marty was born on October 6, 1925, in Prairie du Chien, WI, the son of Martin E. and Clara (Nachreiner) Meister. Bud graduated from Reedsburg High School. On October 26, 1948, he was united in marriage to Phyllis E. Stowell at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Reedsburg. This marriage was blessed with four children. Bud was a Star Route Mail Carrier for 28 years and later worked for Holiday Wholesale, Wisconsin Dells. Marty was a faithful member of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Reedsburg. He was well known in the area for selling Fall Festival tickets for the church each year. He enjoyed morning coffee with his friends most days shaking dice for the tab. Above all, Bud cherished the time he spent with his family, especially his grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

    He is survived by his wife, Phyllis;
    children: Tim and Vicki Meister of Lyndon Station,
    Jackie and Terry Ragus of Madison, and Tom and Anna Meister of Lyndon Station; daughter-in-law, Lynette Meister of Reedsburg; 11 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; two brothers: Richard E. and Shirley Meister of Wisconsin Dells, and Paul P. and Mary Meister of Reedsburg; many nieces and nephews along with other relatives and friends.

    Marty was preceded in death by his parents; and son, Terry Meister.

    A Mass of Christian Burial for Martin J. Meister will be conducted at 11:00 AM on Saturday, November 30, 2013, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Reedsburg, with Father Thomas Monaghan officiating. Burial will follow in Calvary Cemetery. Visitation will be conducted on Friday from 5:00 until 8:00 PM at the Farber Funeral Home, Reedsburg, and on Saturday morning from 10:00 AM until the time of the service at the church. Memorials may be made to Sacred Heart School for books and computers.
Census DateLocation
24 April 1930Bear Creek, Sauk, WisconsinMartin J. Meister was listed as a son in Martin Edward Meister's household on the 1930 Census at Bear Creek, Sauk, Wisconsin; living next door to Frank Nachreiner.1

Child of Martin J. Meister

Citations

  1. [S250] U.S. Federal Census 1930 U.S. Federal Census, by Ancestry.com, Year: 1930; Census Place: Bear Creek, Sauk, Wisconsin; Roll 2609; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 8; Image: 45.0.